Watch the Documentary on Remineralization in Rural Brazil

RTE has released a documentary about a research project proving remineralization to be an effective and sustainable strategy for producing higher yields and nutrient dense crops in remote Brazilian communities. Click “Read more” to watch the video in Portuguese with English subtitles.

In the magazine section of RTE’s blog we recently published an article titled Remineralization in Rural Brazil describing the exciting research project implemented by Suzi Huff Theodoro, a geology and sustainability professor at the University of Brasilia. During the 5 years of the project she has been helping remote communities of slave descendants in the Northeastern state of Bahia to increase the nutritional value as well as yields of their crops with rock dust and other natural means. The project supported these communities to remain independent from expensive and unsustainable chemical fertilizers, as well as government subsidies, while generating enough surplus to enter the local market.

RTE has also produced a short documentary about the project, which we are proudly presenting here. The film describes the project in further detail, demonstrates various ways of practical application of rock dust, shows some of the highlights and challenges Suzi’s team has faced, and includes interviews with local farmers as well as officials and agricultural professionals. The film also touches on themes of social justice and racial equality, which was one of Suzi’s goals of the project.

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3 Replies to "Watch the Documentary on Remineralization in Rural Brazil"

  • Charles de Matas
    July 15, 2011 (7:14 pm)
    Reply

    Great work Joanna. I’m glad to see people in Bahia benefitting from rockdust. I would like to do some small scale experiments myself with remin.

  • Charles de Matas
    July 15, 2011 (7:35 pm)
    Reply

    I’ve wanted to learn more about Bahia, and about remin, so I’m glad for this. Soil seems pretty worn out there. Maybe adding organic matter from compost would help also.
    Would like to try some remin in the future on a small scale. I used to read your remin magazines many years ago and always found them fascinating and inspiring.

  • Joanna Campe
    July 15, 2011 (9:20 pm)
    Reply

    Volcanic rock dust is highly advocated. After Mount St. Helens and Pinataubo there were great concerns about soils and crops being adversely affected and it was exactly the opposite. The same with the tsunami. The seawater actually increased crop growth.

    A new research study of Dr. Thomas Goreau that I am joining as co-author will be given at the World Conference on Ecological Restoration shows astonishing results With basalt rock dust in Panama for trees. The Conference takes place August 21st-24th in Merida, Mexico. Look for more news soon on the website.

    Joanna Campe
    Remineralize the Earth


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