5 results for group: fertilization


How will minerals feed the world in 2050?

By 2050, the world’s population will have reached 9 billion. To feed that many people, soil fertility will have to be maintained artificially. All fertiliser materials depend on a geological resource: nitrogen (N) fertilizer production needs fossil fuels, and both phosphate (P) and potassium (K) are derived by mining. Irrespective of new biological techniques in plant breeding and genetic modification, soils still need to supply the mineral nutrients that plants require, and these are exported from soil with every harvest. Studies of global offtake of N, P and K from soils through crop production show that although N and P are roughly in ...

Possibilities for Development of the Wood and Forestry Economy in Germany that Include Remineralization

Schwalm-Eder County in North Hesse is especially noteworthy for forestry research because of the potential for developing reforestation on a large scale, especially for the transformation of agricultural land into forests. There is so much overproduction in the agricultural Common Market that about 70% of the agricultural budget of $25 billion is used for the storage of overproduction or for the destruction of it. This has to lead at some point to less intensive agricultural production. The Common market now covers only 40% of its wood requirement; and aside from Japan, the Common Market countries import the most tropical wood, especially from West ...

Information for the Application of Silicate Rock Dust for the Amelioration of Forest Soils

This report contains information for “fertilization with rock dust” with an orientation towards practical application. The widely used term “gesteinsmehl” will be limited here to pulverized rocks of silicate origin.

Compensational Fertilization with Silicate Rock Dust For Buffering Damaged Forest Soils: First Experential Report

The fertilization of forest areas has increased substantially in recent years. In all, since 1982 over 500,000 hectares of forest were fertilized which is more than 7% of the forest area (in Germany). On about 95% of the areas fertilized in 1988, magnesium-containing lime (various types such as dolomite, limestone, etc.) was applied. On about 15% of the area, additional fertilization with several minerals, containing potassium and phosphorus were applied, in addition to the limestone.

Effect of Silicate Rock Dust in Forests: Result of the Experiments in the Forest of Arenberg-Schleiden after Five Years

The advantage of rock dust is that it is a natural, raw material, and carrier of numerous minerals and trace elements with long term effect. The nutrients are released slowly and gently during the process of natural weathering in the forest ecosystem (without fertilization shock). In the following, we report the latest results of the experiments in the forest of Arenberg-Schleiden.