11 results for group: report


Carbon Dioxide Mineralization Feasibility in the United States

Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is one of many methods for stabilizing the increasing concentration of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere. The injection of CO2 in deep subsurface sedimentary reservoirs is the most commonly discussed method; however, the potential for CO2 leakage can create long-term stability concerns. This report discusses the feasibility of an alternative form of geologic CO2 storage: CO2 mineralization. In this method, CO2 reacts with rocks and minerals to form solid and stable carbonate rocks. New pilot projects and laboratory-based kinetics experiments have revealed that this method, both in situ and ex situ, may be a viable ...

Information for the Application of Silicate Rock Dust for the Amelioration of Forest Soils

This report contains information for “fertilization with rock dust” with an orientation towards practical application. The widely used term “gesteinsmehl” will be limited here to pulverized rocks of silicate origin.

Pot Test Trial II of Basalt, Serpentine, Bentonite, Feldspar, and Kaolin

This is a report on the second set of pot test trials run by Dr. Gernot Graefe at the Gartnerhof in Ganserndorf Sud near Vienna.

Compensational Fertilization with Silicate Rock Dust For Buffering Damaged Forest Soils: First Experential Report

The fertilization of forest areas has increased substantially in recent years. In all, since 1982 over 500,000 hectares of forest were fertilized which is more than 7% of the forest area (in Germany). On about 95% of the areas fertilized in 1988, magnesium-containing lime (various types such as dolomite, limestone, etc.) was applied. On about 15% of the area, additional fertilization with several minerals, containing potassium and phosphorus were applied, in addition to the limestone.

Remineralization Trials: Minplus and Bananas A Cost Benefit Study

Banana Growers Kevin and Gary Harding have been trialing rock dust from Pin Gin Hill quarry since mid-1985. Using experience gained from these trials they radically altered their fertilizer applications, and in August 1990 planted out a 4 Hectare block using Minplus rock dust as the main fertilizer.

Effect of Silicate Rock Dust in Forests: Result of the Experiments in the Forest of Arenberg-Schleiden after Five Years

The advantage of rock dust is that it is a natural, raw material, and carrier of numerous minerals and trace elements with long term effect. The nutrients are released slowly and gently during the process of natural weathering in the forest ecosystem (without fertilization shock). In the following, we report the latest results of the experiments in the forest of Arenberg-Schleiden.

A Technique Called N-Viro Soil Remineralization Using Sewage Sludge Mixed with Cement Kiln Dust

Roughly 140 billion pounds of sewage sludge are produced annually in the U.S. in an attempt to separate our human wastes from the waters we mix them with. This number has steadily increased over the last two decades as more stringent waste water treatment regulations have been put into effect. Standard methods for dealing with sludge have included incineration, ocean dumping, landfilling, land application on farms and composting.

An Interview with Dr. Robert Bruck, Ph.D. Director of the Environment for North Carolina on the State of the Appalachian Forests and Remineralization

In North America we’ve seen over the past ten or fifteen years significant and serious decline of certain forest species. The ones we’re most concerned about are high elevation red spruce and Fraser fir forests in the Appalachians. These forests comprise very unique mountaintop ecosystems on four, five and six thousand foot peaks. They’re quite rate in that they’re remnants from the last glaciation period: very beautiful, very unique. We’ve seen very rapid decline, dieback and death of these forests occur to a great extent in high elevations of the eastern Appalachians.

Preliminary Results for the Soil Remineralization Forestry Trials On Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina

This is a brief summary of our preliminary experimental data regarding the effects of Planters II on the growth and survival of red spruce and Fraser fir. As a brief introduction, I would state that red spruce and Fraser fir are the boreal montane ecosystem species here in the high Appalachians of the northeastern and southeastern U.S. These tree have undergone tremendous stress via air pollution over the past several decades and, indeed, certain air-borne and satellite surveys have indicated that as much as 40 percent of this ecosystem has already died.

Soil Improvement: The Step Beyond Men of the Trees Remineralization Trials

Western Australia is semi-arid, with annual rainfall on the same order as Africa’s Sahel. Our soils are ancient many millions of years old. Ages of weathering and leaching, and a few decades of farming with soluble NPK fertilizers, have left them impoverished. Today, despite the greatest care, each year large tracts of land are lost to salt and wind erosion. Shelterbelts of trees are indispensable allies in an effort to reverse this loss of farmland, and to anchor a regeneration of the soil. Significant forest cover can eventually stabilize the local climate, too. The Western Australia chapter of Men of the Trees is dedicated to this task.