5 results for group: fertilizer-1


How will minerals feed the world in 2050?

By 2050, the world’s population will have reached 9 billion. To feed that many people, soil fertility will have to be maintained artificially. All fertiliser materials depend on a geological resource: nitrogen (N) fertilizer production needs fossil fuels, and both phosphate (P) and potassium (K) are derived by mining. Irrespective of new biological techniques in plant breeding and genetic modification, soils still need to supply the mineral nutrients that plants require, and these are exported from soil with every harvest. Studies of global offtake of N, P and K from soils through crop production show that although N and P are roughly in ...

Soil Rejuvenation in Mauritius

Mauritius is a tropical island of volcanic origin. The high altitudes attained lead to wide variation in precipitation. To windward, and on the higher altitudes this precipitation may be very high; to leeward, protected by the intervening heights, low precipitation is found. There is, too, only a slight difference in temperature at all altitudes. In the regions of higher precipitation, therefore, the conditions are favorable for a rapid depletion of the soils and the parent basaltic matrix in such areas has broken down, leaving lateritic soils which are very infertile.

Pot Test Trial II of Basalt, Serpentine, Bentonite, Feldspar, and Kaolin

This is a report on the second set of pot test trials run by Dr. Gernot Graefe at the Gartnerhof in Ganserndorf Sud near Vienna.

Remineralization Trials: Minplus and Bananas A Cost Benefit Study

Banana Growers Kevin and Gary Harding have been trialing rock dust from Pin Gin Hill quarry since mid-1985. Using experience gained from these trials they radically altered their fertilizer applications, and in August 1990 planted out a 4 Hectare block using Minplus rock dust as the main fertilizer.

A Technique Called N-Viro Soil Remineralization Using Sewage Sludge Mixed with Cement Kiln Dust

Roughly 140 billion pounds of sewage sludge are produced annually in the U.S. in an attempt to separate our human wastes from the waters we mix them with. This number has steadily increased over the last two decades as more stringent waste water treatment regulations have been put into effect. Standard methods for dealing with sludge have included incineration, ocean dumping, landfilling, land application on farms and composting.